2020 AABB Annual Meeting On-Demand

Oct 3, 2020 ‐ Oct 3, 2020



Access to the 2020 AABB Annual Meeting On-Demand sessions expires on December 31, 2022. Each session includes the on-demand recording and a downloadable MP3 audio file. Presentation handouts are not available/included.

Planning Committee Disclosures


Sessions

AM20-42: Rh Disease: Still a Global Problem

Oct 5, 2020 3:45pm ‐ Oct 5, 2020 4:45pm
Expiration Date: Dec 31, 2022

Credits: None available.

Despite regulatory approval in 1968 for the human use of Rh(D) immune globulin to prevent Rh disease of the fetus and newborn, Rh disease still occurs in many parts of the world. In fact, Rh(D) immune globulin is ~99% effective at preventing Rh disease when women receive the drug both antepartum and postpartum. As a result, Rh disease has virtually disappeared from Western Europe, Canada, the United States, and Australia. However, due to a lack of education, awareness, and availability of the drug, Rh disease remains prevalent in other parts of the world, leading to hundreds of thousands of families affected by repeated miscarriages, stillbirths, and neonates with hyperbilirubinemia-related adverse outcomes, including kernicterus spectrum disorder. Indeed, it is estimated that ~50% of the pregnant women around the world who need Rh(D) immune globulin do not receive it, which amounts to ~2.5 million women each year.

This educational session will provide up-to-date information regarding the continuing global burden of disease for this disorder, explore the reasons why this problem persists, and offer potential solutions for remediation. It will also provide attendees with the most current consensus approaches for preventing Rh disease in various clinical settings. Finally, several new therapeutic approaches have been recently proposed to prevent and/or treat Rh disease, in particular, and other variants of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn, in general; these will be described along with a discussion of their underlying therapeutic mechanisms.

Learning Objectives:
  • Appreciate the ongoing global burden of Rh disease, explain various reasons for this phenomenon in different high income and low-middle income countries around the world, and propose several possible remediation strategies.
  • Describe current consensus approaches for preventing Rh disease in various clinical settings, particularly focusing on approaches in high income and low-middle income countries.
  • Describe two novel approaches for preventing and/or treating hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (i.e., monoclonal Rh(D) immunoglobulin and monoclonal antibody to the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn)), and describe the relevant therapeutic mechanism(s).
Speaker(s): Disclosures
  • Hua Shan, MD, PhD : Nothing to disclose
  • Sarah Vossoughi, MD : Nothing to disclose
  • Krystalyn Hudson, Ph.D : Nothing to disclose
Standard: $25.00
Members: $20.00

AM20-43: Strategies for Mitigating Human Error in Transfusion Medicine

Oct 5, 2020 3:45pm ‐ Oct 5, 2020 4:45pm
Expiration Date: Dec 31, 2022

Credits: None available.

Medical error continues to be a problem bedeviling the practice of transfusion medicine (TM). Whether the major contributor to error is 'systems error' or 'human error' is not fully understood. However, eliminating or mitigating different kinds of errors will require different approaches and specific strategies. This session will focus on strategies for mitigating human error in TM. Speakers in this session will present three different strategies. One speaker will discuss the topic cognitive bias as source of error and present a range of bias mitigation approaches that have been implemented with some success to reduce error in other medical specialties. A second speaker will present a recent innovative approach of User-Centered Design (UCD) that was successfully implemented at a major academic medical center to reduce errors in blood product orders and order sets. A third speaker will present a range of strategies implemented by the SHOT (Serious Hazards of Transfusion) group in the United Kingdom over a period of years to mitigate human error. The session will provide attendees with an enhanced understanding of the nature of human error, and with a range of strategies to mitigate this form of error. The audience will be invited to participate by describing their own experiences with human error in TM, and to suggest strategies for mitigating it.

Learning Objectives:
  • Describe the nature and kinds of human errors that are most prevalent in transfusion medicine
  • Review three different approaches towards mitigating human error in transfusion medicine
  • Generate audience participation in a discussion (via audience response system) on other approaches for mitigating human error in transfusion medicine
Speaker(s): Disclosures
  • Quentin Eichbaum, MD, PhD, MPH, MFA, MMHC, JD, FCAP, FASCP : Nothing to disclose
  • Cassandra Josephson, MD : Consultant: Immucor, Octapharma, Biomet Zimmer; Grant/Research Support: Medtronics, Sysmex
  • Shruthi Narayan, MD : Nothing to disclose
Standard: $25.00
Members: $20.00

AM20-44: Delivering Next Generation Cell and Gene Therapies: Toward FDA Approval for Early Stage Clinical Trials

Oct 5, 2020 3:45pm ‐ Oct 5, 2020 4:45pm
Expiration Date: Dec 31, 2022

Credits: None available.

Presented in collaboration with Be The Match BioTherapies®

This session will provide an overview of cell and gene therapy product development from proof-of-concept to an FDA (Food and Drug Administration)- approved clinical therapy. Speakers will address technology transfer from the academic or industry research lab to the clinical manufacturing facility. Key strategic contracts and agreements will be described. Steps required for translation to a clinical grade product including scale-up or scale-out, closed manufacturing processes, transition to clinical grade reagents and supplies and assay development will be discussed. Finally, refining the manufacturing process for IND (Investigational New Drug) submission including validation, lot release testing and stability studies will be demonstrated. Examples will include contemporary cell and gene therapy products currently progressing through clinical trials. The speakers are Principal Investigators from three of the five cell processing facilities contracted by The Production Assistance for Cellular Therapies (PACT) Program - a National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) funded resource initiative created to provide support for cell therapy-based IND-enabling translational research.

Learning Objectives:
  • Identify the optimal team for successful cell and gene therapy product development.
  • Describe how to leverage the skills of your staff to drive the process.
  • Establish realistic time lines and budgets.
  • Plan for hurdles and pitfalls with appropriate contingency plans.
  • Manage expectations for all stakeholders.
Speaker(s): Disclosures
  • David McKenna, MD : Nothing to disclose
  • Adrian Gee : Nothing to disclose
  • Linda Kelley : Nothing to disclose
Standard: $25.00
Members: $20.00

AM20-45: Automated Hemovigilance: Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources (FHIR) and Big Data Analysis

Oct 5, 2020 6:00pm ‐ Oct 5, 2020 7:00pm
Expiration Date: Dec 31, 2022

Credits: None available.

Effective blood product safety monitoring faces many obstacles, including difficulty detecting unreported adverse reactions to blood transfusion and difficulty recognizing actionable patterns in the sheer volume of potentially relevant clinical data due to lack of standardized reporting. For example, signs and symptoms of transfusion reactions may be buried in the free text of nurses’ notes and vital signs flowsheets, making automated review problematic. Access to administrative data and missing patient information are additional challenges.

The U.S. Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER) is addressing these obstacles through its Biologics Effectiveness and Safety (BEST) system. Launched in October 2017, this program seeks to expand and enhance access to new and better data sources, methods, tools, expertise, and infrastructure to conduct surveillance and epidemiologic studies. Standardized data models such as the HL7 Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources (FHIR) and secure data exchange protocols such as "SMART on FHIR" can facilitate the development of innovative approaches to utilizing electronic health records (EHR) effectively in order to establish semi-automated adverse event identification, validation, and reporting. To solve the challenge of embedded EHR text, natural language processing and other machine learning methods are potentially powerful approaches. The future in this area is very promising, but success will require close collaboration between numerous disciplines, including clinical stakeholders, “big data” scientists, and informatics experts.

In this session, we will define the basic concepts related to “big data” analysis, including data management, interoperability, exchange of protected health information, and machine learning. We will then discuss how these concepts are currently being employed in the application of blood safety through the BEST system. Finally, we will address successes and challenges of this approach, as well as the potential benefits of public-private partnerships in blood safety and beyond.

Learning Objectives:
  • Discuss concepts and tools used in large-scale data analytics and how these are applied to data extraction and monitoring for blood safety.
  • Describe CBER’s Biologics Effectiveness and Safety (BEST) program.
  • Discuss prototype development of the BEST program within a hospital system, including benefits and obstacles.
Speaker(s): Disclosures
  • Aaron Hettinger, MD : Nothing to disclose
  • Hamilton Tsang, MD : Stockholder: Google, Amazon
  • Alan Williams, PhD : Nothing to disclose
Standard: $25.00
Members: $20.00

AM20-46: Preparing Your Transfusion Service and Cellular Therapy Laboratory for Clinical Trials

Oct 5, 2020 6:00pm ‐ Oct 5, 2020 7:00pm
Expiration Date: Dec 31, 2022

Credits: None available.

Presented in collaboration with Be The Match BioTherapies®

Transfusion medicine, including blood bank, apheresis and the cellular therapy laboratory, is an integral part of a multitude and ever-growing number of clinical trials and investigations for medical innovation. Given the rapid evolution of therapies and interventions for which transfusion medicine services are required, it has become imperative that transfusion medicine professionals be well versed in the clinical trials process.

During pre-clinical and clinical development of new therapies, safety and clinical efficacy are studied. Understanding the general process of clinical trials as they progress through preparation and development, execution, and closing will help empower transfusion medicine professionals to actively participate in the process. Transfusion medicine services may be inundated with clinical trials for new therapies sponsored by industry so familiarity with different approaches to handling these trials from a transfusion medicine perspective is critical. In addition, innovation in transfusion medicine and development of clinical trials that are investigator- initiated is an integral part for the advancement of any field. Knowing how to start a clinical trial is important for academic investigators to advance their careers.

This session is designed to highlight important aspects of clinical trials development and participation that are relevant to the transfusion medicine community, with examples from blood bank, apheresis and cellular therapy laboratories.

Learning Objectives:
  • Describe the general process for conducting clinical trials from initiation to close as it relates to transfusion medicine and cellular therapy
  • Discuss the operational considerations when preparing for clinical trials sponsored by external parties
  • Summarize the process for developing an investigator-initiated clinical trial
Speaker(s): Disclosures
  • Yvette Tanhehco : Nothing to disclose
  • Sandhya Panch : Nothing to disclose
  • Suzanne Thibodeaux, MD, PhD : Nothing to disclose
Standard: $25.00
Members: $20.00

AM20-47: Oral Abstract Session -- Rh: Molecular and Clinical Applications

Oct 5, 2020 6:00pm ‐ Oct 5, 2020 7:00pm
Expiration Date: Dec 31, 2022

Credits: None available.

Oral abstract session on Rh: Molecular and Clinical Applications

Learning Objectives:
  • Identify clinical and molecular factors underlying Rh alloimmunization.
  • Describe the potential application of next generation sequencing for Rh genotyping.
  • Describe how CRISPR can generate Rh null RBC.
Speaker(s): Disclosures
  • Sunitha Vege : Nothing to disclose
  • Priyanka Pandey, PhD : Nothing to disclose
  • Hyun An : <p><br></p>
  • Sarah Waldis : Nothing to disclose
Standard: $25.00
Members: $20.00

AM20-48: Incident and Error Reporting: Leveraging the Opportunities for Safer Transfusions

Oct 5, 2020 7:15pm ‐ Oct 5, 2020 8:15pm
Expiration Date: Dec 31, 2022

Credits: None available.

Many improvements in blood safety have rightfully focused on reducing the risks of blood transfusion that are donor-associated, namely reducing the risk of transfusion transmitted infection and the risk of transfusion related acute lung injury. To that end Hemovigilance systems collect transfusion reaction data that serves to validate national or regional changes in blood collection, manufacturing, and testing to make blood products safer than ever. An under-recognized area of the Hemovigilance systems is the collection of errors and incidents associated with identification, selection, storage, and administration of blood products at the hospital level. While reported events may not culminate in harms reaching case-specific patients, they reflect conditions that are conducive to injuries as significant as mis-transfusion or circulatory overload. Hospitals may be limiting in their power to mitigate reactions related to external, upstream factors, but they have opportunities to identify and rectify process errors culminating in harm.

Learning Objectives:
  • Review the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) classification scheme for reporting errors or incidents.
  • Review the pattern of reported errors or incidents at the national and local level.
  • Assess examples of error-reduction initiatives initiated based on use of review of local errors/incidents data.
Speaker(s): Disclosures
  • Ian Kracalik, MPH, PhD : Nothing to disclose
  • Lisa Shifflett, BB(ASCP) : Nothing to disclose
  • Sarah Vossoughi, MD : Nothing to disclose
Standard: $25.00
Members: $20.00

AM20-49: Updates from the 2019 National Blood Collection and Utilization Survey (NBCUS) and Beyond

Oct 5, 2020 7:15pm ‐ Oct 5, 2020 8:15pm
Expiration Date: Dec 31, 2022

Credits: None available.

The biennial National Blood Collection and Utilization Survey (NBCUS) provides the most comprehensive estimation of blood collection and utilization in the United States. The NBCUS collects data on the number of units collected, processed, outdated, discarded, and transfused. The survey includes all blood collection facilities and a sample of acute care hospitals operating in the U.S. Since 2013, the NBCUS is being conducted by the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The latest NBCUS results available in the public domain is from the survey year 2017. During the session, preliminary findings from the 2019 NBCUS, including national estimates for RBC, whole blood, platelet, plasma, and cryoprecipitate collection, transfusion, and outdates as well as median cost paid by hospitals, will be presented. Furthermore, blood component demand data for the first two quarters of 2020 will be presented in aggregate from the blood centers’ side. The presentations will include discussion about the implications of the current trends on maintaining blood safety and availability. The session will also briefly explore the interpretation of the findings to the current business performance trends in the blood collection industry.

Learning Objectives:
  • Describe the trends in blood collection and utilization in the United States
  • Review the most current NBCUS data and blood demand data
  • Discuss the implications of the findings regarding sustainability and safety of the blood supply
Speaker(s): Disclosures
  • Jefferson Jones, MD, MPH : Nothing to disclose
  • John Murphy : Nothing to disclose
  • Nina Salamon : Nothing to disclose
Standard: $25.00
Members: $20.00

AM20-61: 2020 BB/SBB Exam Review

Oct 5, 2020 9:00pm ‐ Oct 5, 2020 9:00pm
Expiration Date: Dec 31, 2022

Credits: None available.

The program attendee will attain a concise and targeted review of blood banking and transfusion medicine. All the information needed to pass the ASCP SBB or BB exams are briefly reviewed in a three-hour program. This program attempts to provide the attendee with the structure, information and encouragement to tackle these exams. This program will provide a plan for those preparing for the ASCP BB or SBB exam. The specific content areas of the exams highlighting where to find information required for successful completion of these exams. Whether a refresher, a review or new learning, the program attendee will benefit from the comprehensive summary of blood banking and transfusion medicine provided by this course.

Learning Objectives:
  • Explain the American Society of Clinical Pathologist (ASCP) SBB and BB exam requirements.
  • Identify and explain the topics outlined on the ASCP BB/SBB Exam Content Outline.
  • Define and relate pertinent information from the ASCP Content Outline that will be on these exams to aid in preparing for the BB or SBB exam.
  • Discover helpful hints for studying for and taking these exams.
Speaker(s): Disclosures
  • Lorraine Blagg, MA, MLS (ASCP) SBB : Nothing to disclose
  • Catherine (Kate) Hernandez, MT(ASCP)SBB : Nothing to disclose
  • Paul Mansfield, MT(ASCP), SBB : Nothing to disclose
Standard: $35.00
Members: $30.00

AM20-62: Advances in Understanding of RBC Alloimmunization - Mechanisms and Interventions

Oct 5, 2020 9:00pm ‐ Oct 5, 2020 9:00pm
Expiration Date: Dec 31, 2022

Credits: None available.

Over the last decade, significant innovation has taken place with regards to our mechanistic understanding of immunization to alloantigens on transfused red blood cells (RBCs). Mechanistic innovation has been driven largely by advanced animal modeling that has led to follow up human studies. Conversely, innovative human studies have also led to new questions that have resulted in advances in animal models. In this bidirectional use of animal and human studies, substantial progress has been made in both mechanistic understanding, human epidemiology, and the generation of potential therapeutic interventions. Moreover, the combination of animal and human studies have allowed a careful determination of what basic findings do, or do not, translate into human biology – providing a careful strategic metric for relevant and translatable scientific inquiry. This session serves to inform the audience of recent advances and also communicate the current existing landscape of tools and systems available for ongoing discovery.

Learning Objectives:
  • Define critical mechanistic components of the humoral immune response to transfused red blood cells.
  • Incorporate recent advances in our understanding of alloimmunization into their conceptualization of the clinical problem as well as potential prevention and/or mitigation strategies.
  • Explain the level of our current understanding and the state of the art tools available for ongoing investigation.
Speaker(s): Disclosures
  • Jeanne Hendrickson, MD : Nothing to disclose
  • Chance Luckey, MD, PhD : Nothing to disclose
  • Jaap Jan Zwaginga : Consultant: Roche, Amgen, Sanofi; Speakers Bureau: Roche, Amgen, Sanofi, Viper Ph
Standard: $25.00
Members: $20.00
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